Sunday, February 16, 2014

DANIELLE RIEDE
















What is your name?

Danielle Felice Riede

Where are you from?

North America and Europe. My father was a photographer for the Navy so I was born in Colorado and grew up in Minnesota, Florida, California, Iceland and Virginia. I studied art in Virginia, Italy and Germany.


 Where do you live?

Indianapolis, Indiana

When did you realize that you wanted to be an artist?

 When I was in Kindergarten




Who influenced you as an artist?

My father and mother Nature. My professors: Elizabeth Schoyer, Howard Singerman and Daniel Buren. Wonderful artists like: Turner, James McNeil Whistler, Bonnard, Van Gogh, Cimabue, Giotto, Leonardo Da Vinci, Joseph Beuys, Barnett Newman, Jean Dubbufet, Mark Rothko, Cy Twombly, Joan Mitchell, Cecily Brown, Gordon Matta Clark, Ann Hamilton, Eva Hesse, Robert Smithson, James Turrell, Alberto Giaccometti, Anish Kapoor, etc,The people who designed and built San Marco’s Basilica in Venice, which is absolutely amazing



What is your favorite medium?

Paint or something brand new...  Part of what drives my practice is the sense    of discovery that I find in working with new materials.



Do you have a studio? Where is it?

My studio is in the basement of my home.  However, I typically construct my installations on site, the places where I construct my works also serve as a sort of studio for me.


When did you become a mother?

  When I was in grad school. I had just turned 29 when my daughter was born.

What are your challenges as a mother artist?

Finding balance.  I teach a lot of students and have administrative work as well.  This means that it has been really challenging to find time to make my own work and spend time with my daughter.  My daughter is my first priority.

What has been the driving force behind keeping a balance between being a mother and an artist?

Simply knowing that my calling is to be both a mother and an artist allows me to maintain balance in my life.

When do you spend time making art?

When I have an upcoming project or exhibition I am very focused on my art. Sometimes I also make work when I am with my daughter.  She wants to be an artist when she grows up.

How many children do you have? Do you want more?

One. Maybe.

Have you ever considered giving up art in order to be a mother?

No, even if I am not physically making art, I will always be an artist.

Do you have support from your family and friends to keep making art?

Yes! My husband has helped me a lot.  I have also had friends and family help me.  They have been invaluable.  I have learned to ask for help when II need it, otherwise some of my projects would have been impossible to realize. Thank you friends and family!



When do you spend time making art?

When I have an upcoming project or exhibition. When I am alone and sometimes when I am with my daughter.  She wants to be an artist when she grows up.


What is your favorite medium?

Paint or something brand new...  Part of what drives my practice is the sense of discovery that I find in working with new materials.







How many children do you have? One







Have you ever considered giving up being an artist in order to be a mother?

No – even if I am not physically making art, I will always be an artist




What is your advice for a new artist mom?

Take plenty of time for yourself and your baby.  Get as much support as possible from work, family and friends.  Do NOT put high expectations on yourself to create work or have exhibitions.  Give yourself the room and  space to be at one with your new baby and yourself.


Do you have support from family & friends when making art?

 My husband has helped me a lot.  I have also had friends help me.  They have been invaluable.  I have learned to ask for help when I need it, otherwise some of my projects would have been impossible to realize. Thank you friends and husband!


Do you feel like you are taken seriously as a mother artist?

 Not always. For example, an artist who I respected reacted strangely to my pregnancy announcement. Before knowing about my pregnancy,he told me that he thought that I had a good chance of becoming a famous artist.  However, after discovering that I was pregnant, he dismissed my art making potential by saying that I had chosen a DIFFERENT path. This was so discouraging!I do believe that a lot of people still take me seriously as a mother and an artist.



Has becoming a mother influenced your art?

Yes. My work has become more playful since the birth of my daughter.


Do you think mother artists are taken seriously in society?

Yes, by parts of society, mother artists are taken seriously. Those are the parts of society that I want to align myself with. 

What do you say when someone asks, “what does your husband do for a living?” are you offended by such a question?

I don’t really get asked this question.  However, I could imagine other artist moms being offended by that question.




What is your story?

I consider myself to be a loving and open person. However, being a mother, I have found that establishing clear boundaries in relationships with everyone is crucial.  This enables me to be organized enough to find time to make art, be a mom and maintain my position as a tenure-track professor. Due to the intense nature of university teaching positions, finding balance has been a challenge. Before becoming a mom and a professor, I had more time to be dreamy in life. Now I feel that I am more appreciative of little moments in my everyday life.  I have also come to understand that I am indeed mortal and will not live forever.  I need to take care of my family and myself, and give myself the time to create work.  My path as a mother has made me more empathetic. I now understand that everyone in the world has struggles and pain. The birth of my daughter and my life as a mom, have made me more aware of my life as a mom, have made me more aware of my connection to others.  I see myself as part of the human fabric.


What have you learned about balancing motherhood and your passions?


It can be extremely difficult. However, it’s worth it!




What advice can you offer other mother artists about pursuing their passions regardless of their situation?


I would tell other artist moms not to give up on their dreams. By taking care of themselves, they will find satisfaction in their lives and have more energy for their art and their families.  This leads to happiness and a sense of fulfillment.Sometimes, making art may be impossible.  This does not mean that artist moms are no longer artists. Mothers who are artists must have the courage to immerse themselves in their art, even after a long break from making.




What do you want to be remembered for as an artist?

I hope that my works help my viewers to slow down and open their senses. I strive to inspire a sense of wonder with my work.






Danielle Riede lives in Indianapolis, Indiana with her husband and daughter. 
To see more of her work visit:








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