Tuesday, November 18, 2014

ERIN TRIMBLE





What is your name?

Erin Michelle Trimble or just ‘e’.


Where are you from? 

Born in Sullivan, Indiana on June 28th of 1980; making me 34 years old.


Where do you live?

I currently reside in Plainfield, Indiana.


When did you realize that you wanted to be an artist?

As soon as I realized the potential of pencils and crayons; and pausing my Walt Disney movies so I could mimic everything that I saw. I was an only child and I think that helped my imagination; I was drawing make believe characters in preschool and my imaginary world was and is still one bit of magic that I hang onto so tightly.


Who influenced you as an artist?

Honestly, no one...not right away. The influence is embedded in my childhood, taking that only child, alone time and bringing things to life. No one in my family is/was an artist but my folks were/are very supportive. At Monrovia High School, here in Indiana, my 7th grade art teacher, Mr. Schafer was a really big influence. He paid for me to go to my first nude figure drawing college class for HS students and also made sure my art was always in school shows and such. I went to a lot of Herron High School Saturday classes with his daughter back when it was at the ‘old’ Herron; so much fun. He really pushed me, made me feel as though I had potential and that certainly gave me inspiration and influenced me. Just a few better known artists that I love and appreciate are Kathe Kollwitz, Frida Kahlo, Shepherd Fairey, Swoon and Monica Caanilao. 





What is your favorite medium?

My Art Collaborative partner, Nevada Buckley King and I had a ‘BlOODSISTERS’ show a few first Friday’s ago and a fellow from the Indianapolis Star asked what it was we do? Slightly taken off guard, instead of saying, ‘We are Artists.’ I blurted out, ‘Dabblers! We dabble!’ ha-ha and that is indeed true. It is very hard for me to name a favorite because I mix so many; Watercolor, ink, pastel, found objects, installation, transfers; printing,weaving and textiles, books, jewelry...on and on; So many tools, so many ideas and possibilities.




Do you have a studio? Where is it?

I do indeed, it is my garage hooked onto my apartment. Sometimes I fantasize about extra money to have a nice, fancy studio at a different location like others I know BUT my garage is great. I sit on my cushions, on the floor, surrounded by all of my supplies and treasures; candles, music (or solitude and silence), paper, books, and all the things I need…surrounding me in a circular manner. And it is at home! To me, it is the best place and my favorite place to be.



When did you become a mother?

I became a mother on September 11th, 2003 at 1:10 pm in the afternoon….such a beautiful day. 



What are your challenges as a mother artist?

Just trying to stay afloat financially, I suppose. I do not get child support so I have to work, mother and make art; I also have to have part time jobs that allow me to take my son to school and pick him up (child care is crazy!) so it is really slim pickings out there. I do have a fellow of 4 years that has given us stability, love and care and I am grateful for that. Even with our incomes, it is still a dang struggle! I always thought getting a college degree would assure financial stability, but I was a wee bit mistaken, ha ha ($50,000 I feel as though I will neeever be able to pay back), aye! 



What has been the driving force behind keeping a balance between being a mother and an artist?

Balancing being a mother and an artist was of course difficult when Silas was an infant. I had no help from his father so it was Silas and I solo quite often. I made when I could; while he napped, late nights or while he was content with his swing. There would be times I would go days and weeks without making but with my first baby, I suppose that was to be expected. The driving force with raising a baby/toddler and going to college at the same time was all Silas. I wanted that degree to be an educated mother, to expand on my art knowledge/tools and to be able to get a good job…because I wanted it to benefit him and myself. Nowadays, it seems as though the driving force has been an entity all of its own.  




When do you spend time making art?

When I am off work and Silas is at school, so early mornings are my favorite, around 8 a.m. Then, after Silas goes to bed at night, that is my second wind and I usually stay up way too late.



How many children do you have? 
Do you want more?

I just have my one, sweet guy (11 yrs) Silas Michael. I think I would really love to have a daughter too, but it depends on my partner. I have already had a child with one man that doesn’t help; I am kind of scared to be put in that situation again. Although I have no doubt that I could raise another child alone, money unfortunately is a big part, being able to get the kiddo everything he/she needs. Baby fever is no joke! They are just so wonderful.




Have you ever considered giving up art in order to be a mother?

I would lose my sanity if I ever gave up making art!! The thought has honestly never crossed my mind. I think that things have always worked in our favor to where my art time has never interfered with me being a mother.



Do you have support from your family and friends to keep making art?

Yes, 100% from my mother, if my father were here, my tiny tribe and my dearest friends. I get doubts from some people, I pick up on vibes like, ‘it is obviously not a money making thing so why are you doing this’ like it is wasting time!? I am going to keep doing it no matter what people think. It is my career, I have spent my whole life getting to this point, making it through schooling and of course I hope to make money from it. It isn’t just the money though; it is something that I have to do every day. It is almost a compulsion,release of different emotions, it will always be therapeutic thus it is needed. 



Do you feel like you are taken seriously as a mother artist? 

I do from the people that matter most in my life.





Has becoming a mother influenced your art?

I think that it took me back to my roots; of imaginary stuff, animals, dreams and magical things…things that are so important to children. They should be just as important to us! 



Do you think mother artists are taken seriously in society?

They better be!! I assumed we were all equals so I hope that’s a good thinng!!Honestly, that really has not crossed my mind in that manner either…but maybe ‘re-phrased’ in my mind a bit. I had a moment while at Herron, where I realized that a majority of my class mates were almost a decade younger than me; did not have children and lived a totally different life style, which is fine! I just felt pretty ghostly for my first 2 years…even invisible to teachers; like being older and having a kid put me in some sort of high school group. And for awhile, that did give me a feeling that I wasn’t taken seriously but eventually I found a nice handful of old souls that I fell in love with and will forever hold dear in my heart; Amazing artists and such wonderful people. Now I need to ask other lady artists! I don’t know if this was just situational or a common theme.




What do you say when someone asks “what does your husband do for a living?” are you offended by such a question?

Most folks know that I am not married and if they ask what my fellow does, I just tell them…he delivers delicious organic food and sometimes we get freebies! At times, I think I do get a defensive feeling. Again, I pick up on strange vibes that folks think that because I am an artist that I don’t do enough. I may only work a part-time job, but I do that, deal with Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus and other Auto Immune Disease symptoms, clean house, do laundry, raise a young boy, make art, have shows, run an etsy store so just because I don’t have a normal, full time job like the fellow, certainly doesn’t mean that I do any less. 



What is your story?

My dad used to tell me that crows and vultures dropped me off on their door step and I was so cute they had to keeep me. I was actually born in a hospital…in rural, Sullivan, Indiana to Michael Dean Trimble and Julie Kay Meier Trimble. The greatest people I have known. My dad was a Police Officer and my ma has always been in the Mortgage Business. I started Kindergartenbin Monrovia, Indiana and graduated from there, with no more than 70 kids in my class; small town business. I was the tiny, bullied child but the 90’s changed me. I got into art more as an escape…release, music, bought a bass & amp; guitar, the riot grrrl movement, feminism and all of that combined gave me the strength to power through and figure myself out; to never let anyone make me feel bad about myself without my permission. I still have to remind myself of this at times because I am super sensitive. In between my HS graduation and now…are SO many shenanigans and stories…a tale of a young lady’s evolution; young  marriage, divorce, off and on college classes, living in New Orleans for a bit, ridiculous, fleeting romantic ‘moments’, jerks, playing music in bars on open mike nights, meeting amazing people and friends, life lesson learning, meeting my sons father, giving birth, raising thatlil’ babe as a stay at home mama until preschool and taking night classes at college and being a fine art model (sticking with college this time, Silas being the major drive..to better our lives), more life lessons, becoming a single mother, the death of my father to ALS, graduating Herron School of Art, surviving, job hunting, art making It’s a long, rambling story and it isn’t done yet. 



What have you learned about balancing motherhood and your passions?

Balancing these is crucial...yet I do forget sometimes when I fall into a depression chunk hole. Being a mother, the kiddo is always first and foremost. ‘Mother’ is a beautiful name and thing to be; but how can a Mother maintain her state of total well being if she has no passions? Or gives them up? We are multi-faceted and can do more than mothering. It is the passions that keep us going, as well as our children. We are some multi-tasking mother, artist, warrior, magic ladies!! 




What advice can you offer other mother artists about pursuing their passions regardless of their situation?

Passions are important to the soul, never give those up. You are a mother, which means that you are powerful and can do anything!! The struggle can either be temporary or permanent, but with that we must deal. Key word…multi-tasking.




What do you want to be remembered for as an artist?

I hope someday that I can inspire others…for so many have inspired me. 






To find out more - take a look at the following sites: 


https://www.facebook.com/pages/Erin-M-Trimble-e/349064211865988?
sk=info&tab=page_info

http://instagram.com/_bloodsisters


SeeressVision@etsy.com


*All photos were submitted by and belong to the artist 

Monday, November 3, 2014

CHRISTINA HOLLERING









What is your name?

Christina Hollering


Where are you from? 

Hmmm, that's a tricky one. I was born in Indianapolis but grew up in a military family so we moved every three years. I've live in North Carolina, Panama, Oklahoma, California, 
Las Vegas and then back to Indiana.


Where do you live? 

I currently live in Zionsville, Indiana with my husband, two children, a cat and a lizard.



When did you realize that you wanted to be an artist?

Ha! Not really sure I ever chose to be an artist. Growing up in a military family and being raised as an only child by my grandparents, I spent a lot of time by myself and had to find something to do. Between that, a lack of money and a heart condition that kept me from playing sports, I had to get creative to fill my time. I began drawing in kindergarten, as most of us do, and discovered it held my attention and made me feel good. After high school I never thought about college or my future. I stopped making art and just worked, drank and worried about boys. This lasted until I got married. After ten years of college and switching my major several times, I graduated from Herron School of Art and Design with a degree in painting in 2012. It wasn't until I went to art school that I even considered art as a career. However, two years after graduation and still working as an artist, I couldn't imagine being anything else.





Who influenced you as an artist?

I remember watching my grandmother draw. It was nothing serious to her but she was good! I use to draw everything and take it to her. She was so pleased and would give me honest constructive criticism. This positive reinforcement encouraged me to draw more and more because it made her happy. She still proudly displays my pinch pots and drawings from elementary school.



What is your favorite medium?

Watercolor, acrylic and paper cutting. Anything I use has to be non-toxic or my body freaks out.



Do you have a studio? Where is it?

I currently have two studios. The first one is Two-Thirds Studio in the Murphy Arts Center located near downtown Indianapolis. I share this studio with fellow artists: Lauren Ditchley, Daniel Del Real and Julie Young. My other studio is at home and is the one I've used the most since having my second child.





When did you become a mother?

 I had my daughter, Sophie, in 2007 when I was 26 and my son, Escher, in 2013 when I was 32.




What are your challenges as a mother artist?

Mobility and independence. I can't just move to another state or country for grad school or a job. My daughter has school and my husband has a career and both schedules must be taken into consideration before I agree to anything. 



What has been the driving force behind keeping a balance between being a mother and an artist? 

Preventing grumpiness. When someone in the family starts getting grumpy or short tempered it's usually a good indicator that I've been too focused on work and need to spend quality time with whomever needs it. At the same time I have a strong pull within me to create so I have to find a way to fulfill this longing or my family will be dealing with my grumpiness. We love taking family vacations together and when we do we usually fit in an art museum day or a hiking day so that I can take reference photos. When spending time with my family, ideas are always percolating in the back of my mind . When I'm stuck in the studio, stepping away and focusing on the kids often clears up the blockage.  When I'm working in the studio my daughter is usually next to me either talking to me, making something or playing on the computer. At night I'll sketch while chatting with my husband. My family also comes with me to all my shows and events when possible.




When do you spend time making art?

I usually work during Escher's two naps during the day and then once the kids go to bed. This gives me approximately 4-8hrs a day to work. Before I had my baby I procrastinated more. Now that I have less time I'm more efficient with the time I do get and have learned to jump in instead of over thinking things which ultimately leads to procrastination. Being a mother has helped me master the art of doing it now and has taught me the importance of time management.



How many children do you have? Do you want more?

I currently have two. We would love to have more if we can. I would have ten if we had the resources. They are so cute, how can you not love them?




Have you ever considered giving up art in order to be a mother?

Not to be a mother. 
I have considered giving up art. As I said I did give up art making between the age 18-25 to pursue an more financially secure career. During that time though I still couldn't stop thinking about it. I was still visiting museums and going to shows. At this point in my life I could never give it up. It's deeply embedded into who I am. It's  an obsession. When I'm not creating I'm watching movies about art, reading about art, looking at someone else's art, thinking about art etc.



Do you have support from your family and friends to keep making art?

Always. I don't think I have one family member that doesn't own a piece of my art. They are always more than happy to give my work a home and proudly tell others about their artist family member. My husband is the best though. He's the one that convinced me to change my major and pursue my passion. Not to mention he supports me financially and provides me with honest feedback and suggestions.



Do you feel like you are taken seriously as a mother artist?

I think so. I don't really think about it much. People usually only take you as seriously as you take yourself. I only have so much time and energy so I use it to focus on my work and not the thoughts of others. In my experience, there will always be negative people who can find something to criticize. So if I'm not being judged for being a mother artist, I would be criticized for being a woman, an American, a Christian or whatever else someone disagrees with. You can't control the opinions of others so it's best just to ignore them and stay focused on your goals.






Has becoming a mother influenced your art?

Yes! It's cliche but when you have children you see the world through new eyes. They are always so passionate about life and curious about everything. So many ideas have developed through an event with my kids. Trips to the zoo, museums, hikes, movies, homework, reading and just learning and exploring together. They expose you to things you wouldn't even consider investigating yourself.





Do you think mother artists are taken seriously in society?

 Probably. The Internet has been a great equalizer. The work is often seen and judged before the artist. Many times I've seen an image online and not even been aware of the name of the artist let alone their sex.



What do you say when someone asks "what does your husband do for a living?" are you offended by such a question? 

My husband is a computer programmer. I'm never offended when someone asks. I'm pretty sure I ask people all the time what their husbands do for a living. I have had people refer to him as my sugar daddy or say , "it must be nice." It is nice. I have a great deal of respect for my husband and he is a wonderful father, husband and provider. He's always been supportive of whatever endeavor I  pursue.




What is your story?

I was born in Indianapolis and moved around a lot. I  lived in Las Vegas for five years. Made a lot of bad decisions. Finally made the right decision and moved back to Indy when I was eighteen. Met my husband through a mutual friend after we had both conveniently just gotten out of long term relationships. We got married, moved to Kokomo, IN and got pregnant three months later, not planned, and had our beautiful baby Sophie. I was attending IUK at the time and switched my major from psychology to fine arts shortly after I had her so I've never known life as an artist (as an adult) without children. Most of the other students in my classes were parents as well so I never thought of the two roles as mutually exclusive. After IUK I transferred to Herron School of Art and Design, graduated in 2012 and have been making and showing art ever since.




What have you learned about balancing motherhood and your passions?

Everything takes time and time is easily wasted so if I want to watch twenty episodes of House I make sure to do so while working. It's also about carving out time for both your work and  your family and being intentional about it. I make sure I take the time and treat studio time as a job with scheduled working hours.


What advice can you offer other mother artists about pursuing their passions regardless of their situation?

Humans are very adaptive and incredible problem solvers. You may feel stuck but creativity often stems from our limitations. If you feel trapped or hindered by your circumstances try to change your perspective or consider it a game, a challenge or a problem to be solved. Other women work and raise children. It can and is being done. Read about or ask other mothers how they do it. Also, ask for help. In the past I've paid my neighbor's daughter to play with Sophie for a few hours while I worked upstairs. It's amazing what you can get done in a few hours when you want to and a few hours here and there add up quickly.




What do you want to be remembered for as an artist? 


Good work? I recently had a cancer scare which really helped to put things into perspective as well a put an urgency into my art making. My first thoughts were, be nicer, spend more time with my family and make stuff faster because frankly, when you're gone the only thing left is what you leave behind. So that's the plan, leave my family with a crap load of art and good memories.



For more information please check out the following links: 

http://christinahollering.com

http://instagram.com/christina_hollering

https://www.facebook.com/ChristinaHolleringArt?fref=nf



* All photographs were submitted and belong to the artist. 

Thursday, September 18, 2014

MICA HENDRICKS







What is your name?

Mica Angela Hendricks


Where are you from? 

I was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, but didn’t live there long.  I’m an army brat; sort of grew up all over.

Where do you live?

We currently live in central Texas.





When did you realize that you wanted to be an artist? 

I didn’t realize you could be anything else!  It’s just what I always did, what I always loved.  My parents weren’t sure whether to let me pursue it in college, or steer me toward a “career,” but I’m glad they let me grow.



Who influenced you as an artist?

Oh so many things!  My mom and dad both painted a lot, and were always so encouraging of my interest in it, and taught me new things.  I was picky with kids’ books—I remember not liking books with bad illustrations, no matter how good the story.  These days, there are too many artists to name, but a few that have influenced my style greatly are Maurice Sendak, Jim Rugg, Terry Gilliam, Eric White, and my daughter.





What is your favorite medium?

My all-time favorite is ballpoint pen.  Sometimes I paint on top of it, sometimes I just do ink washes, sometimes I used colored pen,but it always starts with ballpoint.



Do you have a studio? Where is it?

I have an art room!  Thankfully, every place we’ve lived, I’ve been able to have an art room.  (Although I now have to share it with our daughter…)



When did you become a mother?

I was 35 when I had her, and I had already been married 7 years.I didn’t ever have children on the mind at ALL.  It just wasn’t part of my thought process in the slightest.  I was too self-focused, and didn’t even consider it, til one day my husband said, “I feel like something’s missing,” and asked me to give it some very serious thought.  I did.  For TWO WEEKS STRAIGHT I didn’t think about anything else. And thankfully, once I came back with an “okay, let’s do this,” it all happened pretty quickly after that.





How many children do you have? 

I only have the one.  She was the best decision we ever made, but I’m 40, and I barely have the energy for this one!  Everyone keeps saying “you can totally do it,” but baby years are not for the faint of heart, and I’m just loving spending my time with her right now.


What are your challenges as a mother artist?

I think, finding the time and the focus and the energy to paint.  For the first three years, my focus was ALL her.  When I did get to paint or sew (which was rare), I made things FOR her.  I was completely consumed with the basics of caring for her.  I mentally couldn’t handle much else.  I used to have hours and hours of uninterrupted time, and now I still had those urges to create, but no time or energy to do it.




What has been the driving force behind keeping a balance between being a mother and an artist?

For me, the urge to draw is like an itch; it’s just there, and eventually I have to address it. It wasn’t until she was 4 that she started having her OWN interest in art.  She started drawing like CRAZY, so I began drawing WITH her. I was so amazed and fascinated by her passion for drawing—I could totally relate to it: when the whole world disappears and you just sink into your sketchbook.  I could see that in her, and it was a happy surprise.  I tell the story on my blog about how she asked if she could finish a head I had drawn in a sketchbook, and she added a dinosaur body to it. I found it so fascinating, so I went back later, and painted it up with details.  So there are times we draw and paint together.She’s an only child, so getting her to play on her own is difficult.  These days, I encourage her to either play or do projects or draw while I draw separately in the same room as her, so that she knows that there are times when we can share everything, and times when I create on my own.  She’s very good about that.



When do you spend time making art?

Any time I’m not doing something necessary (like work or everyday things), I draw.  If she watches a show on TV, I draw.  After bedtime, I draw.  Sometimes, she plays legos or sculpts things in clay in the art room while I sew.  Now that she’s older, if I want to sculpt in Sculpey, I give up a little of it to her, so that she can sort of feel like part of what I’m doing.I used to have these hours and hours to paint and draw, and I think the tricky part now is finding time in smaller increments.  While my husband gives her a bath, I grab my sketchbook, or browse other artists on Instagram.  When I wait for her at Gymnastics, I draw.  I’m always looking for tiny bits of time to draw.





Have you ever considered giving up art in order to be a mother?

I don’t know how to “give up” art…it’s just such an integral part of me, like skin.  It’s always there.  Even if no one liked it, if no one saw it, I would still make it.  My focus shifted quite a bit for the first three or four years of her life, and while I didn’t give it up completely, I just didn’t have time for it.  Now that she’s a little older and  in school, I’ve got time, inspiration, and motivation.



Do you have support from your family and friends to keep making art?

Most definitely!  My husband has ALWAYS been supportive.  He doesn’t always understand my need to try new projects but he totally supports it, and has always done whatever he could to make sure it stays a priority.  Family and friends have always kept me in mind when they see opportunities, or things that might inspire me.  I’ve always had a great support system that way.  And Instagram has been very supportive!  I mostly only follow artists on there, and they’re often VERY helpful in sharing ideas about their techniques and process. It’s quite encouraging.





Do you feel like you are taken seriously as a mother artist?

I think getting this recognition for working WITH my daughter has sort of been the key in other peoples’ views to marrying this prior self-focused life as an “artist” with this outwardly-caring life of “mother.” People (myself included) had trouble finding the balance between the two, and have told me seeing our work together has inspired them to do the same.  I take that seriously.I’m  primarily an illustrator, so my freelance work all takes place via phone calls and emails, so my main struggle is trying to conduct a phone call with an art director if my daughter is home and my husband isn’t there to distract her!  But she does come first, and there are times I’ve had to tell someone I’d call them back because I need to take care of some mommy emergency.



Has becoming a mother influenced your art?

VERY much so.  Pre-kid, if you had asked me, I might have told you I had a childlike quality about my work.  Looking back, I completely did not.  I am very literal, and not very spontaneous, so I am usually bound to certain ideas of what things SHOULD look like.  Drawing with my daughter has helped me enjoy the spontaneous process of creating, and not worrying so much about the way things turn out.





Do you think mother artists are taken seriously in society?

I think (as with most jobs) there’s always that idea that if a mother is focused on her own goals and interests that she can’t POSSIBLY be taking care of her child in a full and healthy way.  I don’t feel that men get that same sort of criticism, unfortunately.I used to tell my husband that if friends came over and the house was a mess, they would most likely assume it was MY shortcoming, as opposed to his, or the shortcomings of both of us.But I also don’t often take myself seriously.  I do what I love.  I don’t really care if people accept it or not.  I would create it if no one ever saw it…But I REALLY appreciate it when people enjoy and say nice things!  Although I work in the art field (graphic artist), I don’t rely on my art as a sole source of income, so perhaps I’d feel differently if that were the case.When the post on the drawings with our daughter went viral, I had the typically nasty comments containing judgmental and completely unsolicited parenting advice.  They sting a little, til you remind yourself that they’re not actually people that have any real effect on your life, and don’t have a clue HOW you parent.



What do you say when someone asks, “what does your husband do for a living?” are you offended by such a question?

Maybe it’s because I don’t have many close friends nearby, or because we’re an army family, but I don’t get asked that very often.  I used to be a soldier, too (my husband and I met in the army), so I do think it’s funny when people “talk army” only to him.  Being a soldier is hard work, but in my experience (mom was also an army wife), the family back home also helps hold them up and keep things together.  We all work hard.  It’s got it’s tough moments, but aren’t there always? I try to assume people are just innocently curious, but you can bet if I hear a hint of maliciousness in asking what my husband does, I would totally call it out.




What is your story?

I am still writing my story! I have been lots of things, though.  I have been depressed and dramatically emotional.  I have been shy and mousy. I have been depressed and introverted.  I have become confident and (politely) confrontational.  I grew up moving around with the military.  I have been a soldier.  I have been a roller derby player. I’m a wife.  I’m a mother.  I used to feel like I had something to prove.  Now I just do what I love.




What have you learned about balancing motherhood and your passions?

That it changes.  When you first have a baby, and your whole focus is that baby, it might seem like you’ll never have time for those passions again.  You have to trust that there will be time again.  It might not be the same as before, but if you love it, life will find a way to make room.In my experience, I am lucky that our daughter happens to share my passion for art and creative things.  I find my balance in teaching her new things and encouraging her.  Then, while she is consumed, I find time to pull out my own sketchbook.  


What advice can you offer other mother artists about pursuing their passions regardless of their situation?

If you love it, you will find a way.  There will be time.  Don’t beat yourself up on it, and trust that that time will be there again.  I remember when she was little, reading something that said, “the time will come quickly when she won’t want to spend time with you.”  So I am enjoying it now, mixing my art with hers, my TIME with hers. 




What do you want to be remembered for as an artist?

I think having the post about sharing artwork with our daughter touch so many people, it’s been so amazing to hear all the positive, inspirational comments from people from all over the world.  I’m so very happy with and very proud of that.  That something I learned from sharing time with our daughter had such a positive effect on so many people.  That’s such a great feeling! I’d love to be remembered as a good mother.  As someone who tried my very best to share my art WITH our daughter; to teach her some of what I have learned (since she has a passion for it), and to help her learn about and explore the world the best I could.But if anyone ever talks about my artwork, I’d like them to say that I was fearless in trying new things: I sew,I embroider, I sculpt, I draw, I paint,I marker, and I play-doh.  I’d secretly love to be described as a “renaissance woman” (I remember the phrase “renaissance man” being used when studying DaVinci, and I always wanted to highlight my similar love for a variety of interests and skills).  I have a fierce curiosity for a great many things.  I am always learning new things.  I am constantly inspired.  Life isn’t long enough for all the things I want to create.(What I hope no one will remember, however, is my complete  lack of domestic skills…) 




For more information please check out the following websites: 

http://society6.com/micaangela

http://www.micaangela.com/file/mica_angela.ht
ml


http://busymockingbird.com



 * ALL photographs were submitted by and belong to the artist.